The French architect Dominique Perrault is MIRU’s first official Honorary Supporter. Internationally well-known for his impressive buildings and his vision of the metropolis, he was awarded the prestigious Praemium Imperiale by The Imperial House of Japan in 2015. His recognition and our shared enthusiasm for Japan is a great source of motivation to continue unravelling Tokyo’s fertile urban fabric.

Biography:

Dominique Perrault receives the Praemium Imperiale from Princess Hitachi. Photo © The Japan Art Association/The Sankei Shimbun
Dominique Perrault receives the Praemium Imperiale from Princess Hitachi. Photo © The Japan Art Association/The Sankei Shimbun

Architect of the French National Library after winning the competition in 1989, he has designed, among other works, the Velodrome and Olympic Swimming Pool in Berlin, the extension of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg, the Olympic Tennis Centre in Madrid, Ewha Womans University campus in Seoul, and Fukoku Tower in Osaka. In 2014, he delivers the DC Tower in Vienna, the tallest tower in Austria, an icon of the new business district, as well as the Grand Theatre in Albi, France. In 2015, he launches DPA x, a new research platform and the monographic exhibition Groundscape.

Dominique Perrault conducts major operations of heritage restoration such as the refurbishment of the Dufour pavilion at the Château de Versailles, the Poste du Louvre and the prestigious Longchamp Racecourse in Paris. He received many prestigious prizes and awards, including the “Grande Médaille d’or d’Architecture” from the Académie d’Architecture in 2010, the Mies van der Rohe prize for the French National Library, the French national Grand Prize for Architecture, the Equerre d’argent prize for the Hotel Industriel Berlier and the Seoul Metropolitan Architecture Award as well as the AFEX Award for the Ewha Womans University in Korea. In 2015 he has been elected member of the Académie des beaux-arts and he received the Praemium Imperiale for Architecture. His work is exposed in the world’s greatest museums.